Calcium Supplement

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All laying birds need calcium to make sure that their egg shells are hard enough to withstand being delivered. Calcium supplements are cheap enough, but there’s an even easier way to do it!

At first the idea of saving egg shells to feed back to the very chickens that laid them made my stomach a little queasey. Then one day, while reading about placenta encapsulation, it hit me: animals eat their placentas when they give birth, feeding the shells to my chickens is the exact same thing. For some off reason, this made everything click for me.

It’s an easy enough process to do. After using the eggs, I rinse the shells in cold water to clean off any left over.
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I then toss them on a sheet pan. (Don’t judge me on the condition of my pan – this baby has been through a lot!) I turn the oven on to 250F and those the shells in while the oven is heating up. I leave them in there for half an hour or until I remember that they’re toasting away.

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After the shells cool, I use my mortar and pestle to work them into as fine of a flake as I can. I know that some people feed the shells to their chickens without breaking them up, but to me, that’s just asking to convert these ladies into egg-eaters.

There you have it – free calcium supplements for your girls!

One comment

  1. Boris says:

    Hi. I see no one has answered your qusteion. Sorry about that. Thought I would, at least, offer a response, if by chance you are still having difficulties.Is it possible you have some predator visiting your coop? Young possum, perhaps?If it really is a chicken that is doing it, then.. hmm..Truth is I have never seen this behavior in any of the chickens I have had over the years. I’ve kept Long Island Reds, Cochin bantams, Old English Game bantams, Wyandotte bantams, and Nankin bantams. I have had them cooped and loose. Fed them a variety of feeds, or let them live off the land and have not seen any of my chickens eat their eggs. Weird. What is different?Well, anyway.. recommendations for solving egg eating include increasing the amount and quality of the feed and feeding calcium. Are you feeding your hens poultry oyster shell? Years ago, with my free range chickens, I just recycled the egg shells from the kitchen by crumbling them and feeding them back to the chickens. They ate them up! So that is another way you can increase their calcium intake.Other recommendations you could try would be to darken the nest box area and collect the eggs much more often.Hopefully, something will work here and you will not have to resort to figuring out which hen is the culprit and being forced to remove her from the coop. I have heard, from some people, that the behavior is a learned one and may be hard to correct in certain individual chickens. We’ll see. Good luck with all this.

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